4.09.2014

A to Z Challenge: Handwritten

This post is part of the April A-Z Blogging Challenge. This year my theme is simply, "things I know." Some posts will be informational, some about life lessons, some about things I've learned as an author/blogger.

I love to receive handwritten notes. Emails and electronic communications are nice, of course, but there is something about someone taking the time to sit down and actually write me something in longhand that makes me feel so special. Similarly I enjoy sending people handwritten mail. With the hope of receiving something in return of course, but the joy is in the sending. Snail mail is so much about packages from our own online orders, junk mail, and bills these days. Getting 'real' mail, even just a postcard, is a treat :)

On a related note, it makes me super sad that kids might not be taught how to write in cursive anymore. I know that typing and computer skills are super important, but I think we'd really be losing something if we don't teach our children how to read and write in cursive. How will they read letters from their grandparents? How will they read historical documents? Electronic transcriptions can have the text, sure, but there's something so satisfying in reading a photocopy of the actual writing.

Time to get off my soapbox. What are your thoughts on handwritten letters?

17 comments:

  1. My middle-school son can't read his grandmother's handwritten notes. They are in cursive and a bit messy:) He asked her write him in print. She did. All is well. I've seen museum displays of "important letters." Very intriguing. Love this post on handwriting.

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    1. My middle-school son experienced the very same thing last Friday. He couldn't read a letter in beautiful script from his great-grandmother.

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  2. The day will come when even grandparents won't be writing in cursive, but until that time, those of us who are cursive writers and appreciate a 'real letter with stamps must continue to speak out and share our soon to be lost art of cursive letter writing. I loved cursive writing so much that I practiced and practiced writing the alphabet and like most young girls dreaming of being Mrs. Somebody practiced my name over and over again. Please imagine a pretty cursive signature as I sign off here....
    Love,
    Mrs. Sue at CollectInTexas Gal

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  3. Wonderful reminder of important things. Happy A-to-Z-ing!

    ~ Michelle

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  4. Education is turning a corner. And not necessarily a good one either. Just wait until the zombie apocalypse, then they'll be sorry! *mostly kidding*

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  5. I still write to my Dad who is 82 and my aunt who is 86. We also email, but like you said letters are more personal. Plus I send my dad clippings from the newspaper (yes - old fashioned paper) and cartoons. You can't do that with digital media. And I do print - my lefty scrawl is abominable. Someone has to keep the post office in business - I do my part! Cheers

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  6. Receiving a handwritten letter or postcard is nice and rare these days. Although, I guess that's just the sign of the times. Thanks for sharing this post, AJ.

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  7. I'm with you. There's definitely something to be said for handwritten notes and handwriting. I can't imagine eliminating these skills from the education system. People still need know how to write, especially if there's a blackout or something.

    M. J.
    A - Z Co-Host
    http://mjjoachim.blogspot.com
    http://effectivelyhuman.blogspot.com
    http://lotsofcrochetstitches.blogspot.com

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  8. This reminds me of the Arcade Fire song "We Used To Wait." The song has a lot of ideas, including having to write letters and wait for them to arrive, vs now when everything is instant.

    I never liked cursive though, so I don't mind it leaving :)

    A somewhat similar thing is actual printed books vs. ebooks. While I have a Kindle, I only use it for about every 3rd or 4th book I read. The others I have in physical form, and I like to mail them to friends when I am done. The idea that someone else has held that same book just isn't replicated for ebooks.

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  9. I love getting handwritten notes too! And go through phases where I do such a good job of sending them out (in a lull right now but must get back to that!). Thanks for the reminder :)

    And yes that is disconcerting younger generations not being taught cursive.

    Happy A to Z-ing!
    ~Anna
    herding cats & burning soup.

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  10. I love receiving handwritten letters, and I like sending handwritten cards to my friends by snail mail.
    I enjoyed reading your wonderful post.

    http://romisdg.blogspot.jp/

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  11. I adore handwritten notes & letters as well! I could study handwriting forever, similar to the way I feel about maps. That's a little piece of someone's character and personality right there, in how hard they press pen to paper, in how many flourishes they include in their signature, the spacing between their words.
    When I heard about script not being taught in some schools I was so confused and upset....why on earth would we stop teaching students that? It's such a shame.

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  12. As a family historian, I have concerns about the kids not being able to read cursive. Heck, I have trouble reading some of the handwritten letters (from the 1800's) in my possession and none of the kids will be able to read them in the future. I still communicate with some elderly family members with letters because they don't have computers. I love getting letters in the mail.

    http://yeakleyjones.blogspot.com/

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  13. http://amandabauer.blogspot.com/2011/07/mail-then-and-now.html

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  14. When the grid goes down and it will some day – then what. I'll tout the handwritten til my dying day. The one thing I'd want if stranded on a desert isle is my journal, a pen and refills for each. Most of what I write and all that I have published began on the pages of my journals.

    I still write thank-you notes, a paragraph or two on every birthday and christmas card.

    I guess it's rare. My last year at a lawfirm I was working for, I received 2 thank you calls and one thank you note for the thank you notes I sent for gifts received..
    Perle Champion at
    Perle’s Ink,
    freelance words & art

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  15. When the grid goes down and it will some day – then what. I'll tout the handwritten til my dying day. The one thing I'd want if stranded on a desert isle is my journal, a pen and refills for each. Most of what I write and all that I have published began on the pages of my journals.

    I still write thank-you notes, a paragraph or two on every birthday and christmas card.

    I guess it's rare. My last year at a lawfirm I was working for, I received 2 thank you calls and one thank you note for the thank you notes I sent for gifts received..
    Perle Champion at
    Perle’s Ink,
    freelance words & art

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  16. I love writing and receiving anything handwritten. It's so rare these days and I treasure it. I still have a lot of the notes from friends in high school, and it saddens me that not only would those have been deleted long ago if they were in text form but they would have been limited to 140 characters. I have notes that were 4-5 pages long, and it means a lot to me that someone put thought into them. Same with sending postcards.

    I met a girl on social media a while back that received surprise letters & postcards in the mail from her followers and she was so thrilled b/c she loved handwritten things. I was so amazed that a millennial was like me that I wished I could write her something!

    The Pedestrian Writer visiting from the A to Z blogging challenge

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